Watershed Education Training Videos

Oakton Multi-meter Calibration Video

This video explains and demonstrates the process of calibrating the Oakton Multi-parameter meter for pH. This calibration must be completed in order to obtain accurate measurements in the field. You may choose to calibrate your meter along with the video or simply watch to see how it is done. If you choose to complete the calibration process while watching the video make sure you have your meter, three containers each filled with one pH buffer solution of pH 4, 7, and 10, and a larger container of tap water.

How to Calibrate a Myron

This video explains and demonstrates the process of calibrating a Myron Meter II for pH in preparation of taking measurements in the field. This calibration must be completed in order to obtain accurate measurements in the field. You may choose to calibrate your meter along with the video or simply watch to see how it is done. If you choose to complete the calibration process while watching the video make sure you have your meter, three containers each filled with one pH buffer solution of pH 4, 7, and 10, and a larger container of tap water.

Biofilm Collection in Streams

In this video Dr. Morgan Vis of Ohio University Department of Environmental & Plant Biology demonstrates and explains the collection of biofilm from streams. Biofilm samples are collected from rocks. The sample can be used in the lab to look at the various types of diatoms and other algae living in the stream and to record the level of chlorophyll a (a measure of all photosynthetic organisms) found at each site. This collection method is simple, quantitative, and uses easily obtained collection tools.

Macroinvertebrate Collection in Streams

Dr. Kelly Johnson, Associate Professor, Ohio University Biological Sciences, describes methods and equipment needed to collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from wadable streams. Macroinvertebrates found in streams are good water quality indicators of stream health. The kick and dip net methods described can be used for calculating, the Macroinvertebrate Aggregated Index for Stream (MAIS), a family-level biotic index used for scoring stream health in the Appalachian region.